All posts tagged: sound editing

izotope ozone audio mastering plugin

Ozone 9 delivers effortless, perfect audio mastering control

Ozone 9, iZotope’s audio mastering plug-in, builds further on its predecessor’s strengths. New features assist newcomers at the art and science of mastering while speeding up the workflow for experienced sound engineers. With services and products that automate the mastering process to a more or less acceptable result breathing down their neck, iZotope has chosen the path of assisted mastering with Ozone which does not exclude the real sound engineer’s personal touch.

SoundSource 4 Review

Want to have a different sound volume for each app you use? Perhaps some more oomph when you’re in Safari and a reverb while listening to iTunes? In that case, SoundSource 4 is your friend. It’s Rogue Amoeba’s fourth version of this unobtrusive tool and it’s the most advanced Mac audio access and control panel on the market.

iZotope Neutron 3 Sculptor interface - news of Neutron 3's release.

iZotope announces Neutron 3

iZotope today launches Neutron 3, the mix workflow plug-in. Thanks to advances in machine learning, Neutron 3 Advanced is the first-ever plug-in that listens to the entire session, communicating with every track in the mix.

Exponential Audio R4 reverb module for DAWs. Review.

Exponential Audio Reverb bundle: first impressions

iZotope acquired Exponential Audio, a small company with important DAW plug-ins to create reverbs and other effects. That company was founded by Michael Carnes, a classical musician and recording engineer, who also created many of the preset effects. It was quickly recognised as a trendsetter in the industry.

noide reduction with 2 deity s-mic 2 shotgun microphones

Noise be gone: two Deity S-Mic 2 shotgun mics

An article from a company that’s active in VoIP, video conferencing, etc and a recording that was ruined because an ambulance and police car drove by made me think about noise cancellation using two microphones instead of complex machine-learning algorithms. Could it be that, if you use two identical microphones with good off-axis rejection, you can achieve better noise reduction?