All posts tagged: camera mount

The Uniqball 2-into-1 tripod head is one of the top three best heads available

Tripod heads come in many sizes and formats. There are heads that enable you to position your camera very accurately, in small degrees and in each of the three dimensions individually, while others allow you to freely move the camera in any direction or angle you want by simply releasing a lever or screw. The latter category includes ball heads. Usually and because they’re made to freely move your camera in all directions, ball heads are not suitable for anything but keeping your camera still when shooting with long exposure times or with heavy lenses mounted. In theory, ball heads would be great for videographers — free movement in all directions is what we think about when shooting a movie. However, ball heads don’t restrict movement at all, meaning you can’t easily keep them level with the horizon either. Unless you’re using a special one, the Uniqball.

You need the GoPro Karma Grip for smooth motion video

The GoPro HERO5 is a lovely action camera with its built-in electronic stabilisation, but if you think it’s going to make your footage perfectly smooth, you’re in for a disappointment. No digital stabiliser currently available can make footage look good when the operator has been subjecting the camera to shocks from walking, running or whatever. A real stabiliser is a must-have for those occasions where you can’t keep the camera still. The Karma Grip has been specially designed to stabilise the HERO5.

The first universal panning head for video and time lapse: ShooTools AutoPan

The AutoPan is a universal panning head that allows you to create panoramas as well as focused slides of an object and more. The innovative AutoPan works with sliders and dollies and has multiple usage settings, including one where you use the head as a base for a rotating display. That way, you can also use the AutoPan to create 3D scans of an object. The AutoPan is designed and made in Italy.

Rhino Motion mounting on the slider

How good is your video camera slider at steady slow speeds? One simple way to find out

What good is a video camera slider if it can’t provide rock-solid motion, with no vibrations? And if it does, what can you do about it? By accident I found out there are circumstances the Rhino slider EVO Carbon with its Motion motor creates footage that makes your zoomed-in subject look like a Parkinson patient. This costs time as you need to edit in post-production to get rid of the carriage vibrations. Especially when there’s little weight pressing down on the carriage, vibrations may be a serious problem with any slider. I only know of one slider the developer claims it doesn’t vibrate at all. That’s the Trost slider from Trost Motion. I don’t know if that claim holds true if you would run my very simple test to see if a slider will vibrate. I do know that I have video camera three sliders that all have the vibration problem to some degree. The way I found out was by attaching a GoPro HERO4 to an extension arm you would normally use for carrying a video …

Dinkum Systems clamp with flash

Cling onto your video camera with Dinkum Systems mounting arms and clamps

Dinkum Systems developed flexible mounts, clamps and lens shades for photo and video producers, based on Loc-Line modular hose technology. Loc-Line products were originally applied in the machine tool industry only, but innovative developers like Dinkum Systems expanded the use of this strong and chemical-resistant “ball-in-socket” system to the photo and video studio as well as on the road. Dinkum Systems’ offering is quite a complete line of products and the system itself is extremely robust.