All posts filed under: Tutorials

noide reduction with 2 deity s-mic 2 shotgun microphones

Noise be gone: two Deity S-Mic 2 shotgun mics

An article from a company that’s active in VoIP, video conferencing, etc and a recording that was ruined because an ambulance and police car drove by made me think about noise cancellation using two microphones instead of complex machine-learning algorithms. Could it be that, if you use two identical microphones with good off-axis rejection, you can achieve better noise reduction?

logic pro x

How to avoid audio recorded ex-camera to drift from audio in-camera

If you record audio via an external recorder in order to replace the audio your camera captures, you’ll usually need some sort of a synchronisation tool. The simplest is using a clapper, with the second-best using Red Giant’s PluralEyes. But what if the audio your recorder captures drifts out of sync during recording? Why does that happen and how can you avoid it?

illuminati light meter ios

7 steps to successful measuring of colour temperature of a speed light with the Illuminati light meter for iOS

The Illuminati light meter (links to review) is a Bluetooth light meter – in fact, it’s the only Bluetooth one on the market so far – that you control through an app on an iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. The app is also available on Android, but as I only have an iOS device I’m going to concentrate on that one. The Illuminati meter is one of the two available on iOS devices that can withstand the comparison with a professional, dedicated light meter such as a high-end Sekonic. It’s, however, the only one that measures not just flash output, but also flash colour temperature. Its direct competitor, the Lumu Power, does not support that (yet). While the Illuminati light meter supports flash colour temperature metering, the controlling iOS app has proven to be a little flaky in actually reading a strobe’s colour temperature and displaying it on your iOS device. After a few months of trial and error – especially error – I finally had a conversation with the developers about this and got to find out …

Three ways to change the sound characteristics of your microphone without a DSP-capable audio interface

In the past, we have tested and reviewed an sE Electronics V7 dynamic vocal microphone, an sE2200a large-diaphragm condenser and a RØDE NT1 condenser mic. We found the clarity and flat tone response of the V7 and the NT1 great, but they lack the warmth of the sE2200a. So, after reviewing the Universal Audio DSP-capable Arrow interface, which allows you to use a near-zero-latency Unison plug-in as a preamp that can dramatically change the sound characteristics of the mic you’re using, we wondered if it would be possible to change the sound recorded with the V7 and NT1 in such ways that they would sound more like the sE2200a without losing their own unique qualities. In other words, we wanted to know if you can make your audio sound as if it were recorded with a Universal Audio Unison tube preamp UA 610-B.

RX 6 Advanced

Workflow to make the audio for your movie sound the best with iZotope RX 6 and Ozone 8

If you are recording audio separately when shooting a documentary, interview or movie, chances are you’ll not only have to synchronise it with the footage but also edit your audio to make it sound perfect in post production. The two apps I use for this are the iZotope RX 6 Advanced Audio Editor and the Ozone 8 mastering suite. To be honest, my workflow will only work well with one or two microphones. If you’re recording a classical concert, you may have more than two mics set up to record audio from different parts of an orchestra. You might also be preparing a soundtrack CD from multiple recordings. That’s not the audio post production I’m covering here as those also require careful mixing. Mixing is less of an issue when you’re recording an interview or a commentary to go with a documentary, for example. What I’m going to discuss is how I optimise such recordings. To create a good sounding audio file, you’ll have to record at a high enough gain. If your gain levels …

Preparing your Atomos Master caddies for easier and quicker removal from a Shogun/Ninja Flame/Inferno

Atomos’ latest Ninja and Shogun monitor/recorders are pretty awesome, but if there’s one thing the company should work on it’s the way you have to remove your master caddies from the recorder. I can relate to the need for the caddy to sit really tight when recording, but they should be made in such a way that you don’t have to press so hard you risk damaging the top surface when trying to pry them from the unit.

420 vs 422 subsampling

The mysteries of bit depth and chroma subsampling

Colour depth or bit depth is either the number of bits used to define the colour of a single pixel in a bitmapped image or video frame buffer, or the number of bits used for each colour component of a single pixel. Chroma subsampling is the practice of encoding images by delivering a lower resolution for chroma (colour) information than for luma (lightness). The two combine into what your footage looks like when it has been freshly recorded.

Simple but complete Guide to using the Hahnel Captur Module Pro (2)

In this tutorial you’re going to learn how to use the Hahnel Captur Module Pro and all of its capabilities. Before we start, you should also have a Captur Remote Control set with a Transmitter that is put in Digital Channel Matching mode with at least one Receiver. In addition, you should put your Captur Module Pro in Digital Channel Matching (DCM) mode with at least one other Captur Receiver.

Captur Module Pro

Simple Guide to using the Hahnel Captur Remote Control

With the Hahnel Captur Remote Control you can control a camera or a group of photographic flashlights. The Captur Remote Control is the basic part of a bigger system that includes sensor triggers and intervalometers. This tutorial discusses how to use the Hahnel Captur Remote Control to its full extend and is the first of a series of two. The next tutorial covers the Hahnel Captur Module Pro.

How to use your GoPro HERO3+ skilfully and dazzle your audience

Your GoPro HERO3/3+/4 Black Action Camera is quite a capable camera. How you make the most of it for any type of movie to look perfect, depends on how you set it up. The secret here is to tap into the best quality the sensor and electronics are capable of. This tutorial is based on my experience with GoPro cameras from the HERO2 to the HERO3+, and takes you through the most important settings and issues.