Month: February 2018

Three ways to change the sound characteristics of your microphone without a DSP-capable audio interface

In the past, we have tested and reviewed an sE Electronics V7 dynamic vocal microphone, an sE2200a large-diaphragm condenser and a RØDE NT1 condenser mic. We found the clarity and flat tone response of the V7 and the NT1 great, but they lack the warmth of the sE2200a. So, after reviewing the Universal Audio DSP-capable Arrow interface, which allows you to use a near-zero-latency Unison plug-in as a preamp that can dramatically change the sound characteristics of the mic you’re using, we wondered if it would be possible to change the sound recorded with the V7 and NT1 in such ways that they would sound more like the sE2200a without losing their own unique qualities. In other words, we wanted to know if you can make your audio sound as if it were recorded with a Universal Audio Unison tube preamp UA 610-B.

CalDigit TS3 Plus Thunderbolt 3 Station Review

All-in-one computers like the iMac – even the iMac Pro – rarely have enough ports to satisfy our needs. CalDigit’s small-footprint, cast-aluminium Thunderbolt Station 3 Plus is – what we usually call – a dock that adds a whopping 15 ports to any Thunderbolt 3 machine. The options go beyond the conventional, expanding connectivity as well as charge laptops.

universal audio arrow interface

Universal Audio’s Thunderbolt 3 audio interface, the Arrow, rocks

Arrow, the newest audio interface by Universal Audio has ultra-low latency input monitoring and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) on board. The Arrow is a solo processing interface, meaning it will accept all the Unison and common plug-ins from Universal Audio, but won’t be able to process as many of them as the more expensive models. The Arrow can be had for around €499.

Acoustic correction of your room brings back stereo image: the ARC 2.5 system

Acoustic room correction is a process that only million-dollar studios can afford, at least that’s what many of us think. And yet, with a growing number of movies and videos playing on devices that have wildly differing sound characteristics, sound accuracy at the source is increasingly important. So, is there a system that costs less but is up to the job, nevertheless?